🍒 How to describe the different types of RAM slots - Quora

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Historically, there are three platforms for the Intel P6-CPUs: Socket 8, Slot 1 and Socket 370. Slot 1 is a successor to Socket 8. While the Socket 8 CPUs (Pentium Pro) directly had the L2-cache embedded into the CPU, it is located (outside of the core) on a circuit board shared with the core itself.


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Intel Sockets: LGA 775, LGA 1156, LGA 1366, And LGA 1155 - Upgrading And Repairing PCs 21st Edition: Processor Features
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The CPU socket locks the central processing unit into place, preventing it from moving or being damaged. It also establishes the connection between the CPU and board so data can transfer to the CPU for processing and return. Different models and types of computers require different types of CPU sockets, as not all.


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A Complete List of CPU Sockets - Hardware Secrets
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Computer Processor Types A few years ago, choosing a processor was pretty straightforward.
AMD and Intel each produced two series of processors, a please click for source line and a budget line.
Each company used only one processor socket, and there was a limited range of processor speeds available.
If you wanted an Intel processor, you might have a dozen mainstream models and a half-dozen budget models to choose among.
The same was true of AMD.
OEM Versus Retail-Boxed To further confuse matters, most AMD and Intel processors are available in two types of packaging, called OEM and retail-boxed.
OEM processor packages include only the bare processor and usually provide only a 90-day warranty.
Retail-boxed processors include the processor, a compatible CPU cooler, and a longer warranty, typically three years.
A retail-boxed processor is usually the better deal.
It typically costs only a few dollars more than the OEM version of the same processor, and the bundled CPU cooler is usually worth more than the price difference.
But if you plan to install an after-market CPU cooler for example, because you are upgrading your system to be as quiet as possible it may make sense to buy the OEM processor.
Nowadays, choosing a processor isn't as simple.
AMD and Intel now make literally scores of different processor models.
Each company now offers several lines of processors, which differ in clock speed, L2 cache, socket type, host-bus speed, special features supported, and other characteristics.
Even the model names are confusing.
AMD, for example, has offered at least five different processor models under the same name Athlon 64 3200+.
An Intel Celeron model number that ends in J fits Socket 775, and the same model number without the J designates the same processor for Socket 478.
A Pentium 4 processor model number that ends in J says casino racetrack and resort about the socket type it is designed for, but indicates that the processor supports the execute-disable bit feature.
AMD and Intel each offer the three categories of processors described in the following sections.
Budget processors Budget processors give up a bit of performance in exchange for a lower price.
At any given time, AMD or Intel's fastest available budget processor is likely to have about 85% of the performance of their slowest mainstream model.
Budget processors are more than sufficient for routine computing tasks.
After all, today's budget processor was yesterday's mainstream processor and last week's performance processor.
Budget processors are often the best choice for a system upgrade, because their lower clock speeds and power consumption make it more likely that they'll be compatible with an older motherboard.
The Sempron replaced the discontinued Socket A Duron processor in 2004, and the obsolescent Socket A Athlon XP processor in 2005.
Various Sempron models are available in the obsolescent Socket A and in the same Socket 754 used by some Athlon 64 models.
AMD actually packages two different processors under the Sempron name.
A Socket A Sempron, also called a K7 Sempron, is in fact a re-badged Athlon XP processor.
A Socket 754 Sempron, shown in Figure 5-1 is also called a K8 Sempron, and is really a cut-down Athlon 64 model running at a lower clock speed with a smaller L2 cache and a single-channel memory controller rather than the dual-channel memory controller of the Athlon 64.
Early Sempron models had no support for 64-bit processing.
Recent Sempron models include 64-bit support, although the practicality of running 64bit software on a Sempron is questionable.
Still, like the Athlon 64, the Sempron also runs 32-bit software very efficiently, so you can think of the 64-bit support as future-proofing.
If you have a Socket 462 A or Socket 754 motherboard in your system, the Sempron offers an excellent upgrade path.
You'll need to verify compatibility of your motherboard with the specific Sempron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the Sempron.
For more information about Sempron processor models, visit.
Intel Celeron For many years, the Intel Celeron processor was the poor stepsister, offering too little performance at too high a price.
Cynical observers believed that the only reason Intel sold any Celeron processors at all was that system makers wanted the Intel name on their boxes without having to pay the higher price for an Intel mainstream see more />That all changed when Intel introduced their Celeron D models, which are now available for Socket 478 and Socket 775 motherboards.
While Celeron D models are still slower than Semprons dollar-for-dollar, the disparity is nowhere near as large as in years past.
Like the Sempron, Celeron models are available with 64-bit support, although again the practicality of running 64-bit software on an entry-level processor is questionable.
Once again, it's important to verify the compatibility of your motherboard with the specific Celeron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the This web page />AVOID NON-D CELERON PROCESSORS Celeron processors without the "D" are based on the Northwood core and have only 128 KB of L2 cache.
These processors have very poor performance, and unfortunately remain available for sale.
The Celeron D models are based on the Prescott-core, and have 256 KB of L2 cache.
For more information about Celeron processor models, visit.
A mainstream processor may be a good upgrade choice if you need more performance than a budget processor offers and are willing to pay the additional cost.
However, depending on your motherboard, a mainstream processor may not be an option even if you are willing to pay the extra cost.
Mainstream processors consume considerably more power than most budget processors, often too much to be used on older motherboards.
Also, mainstream processors often use more recent cores, larger L2 caches, and other features that may or may not be compatible with an older motherboard.
An older power supply may not provide enough power for a current mainstream processor, and the new processor may require that free and legal online poker have memory than is currently installed.
If you intend to upgrade to a mainstream processor, carefully verify compatibility of the processor, motherboard, power supply, and memory before you buy the processor.
AMD Athlon 64 The AMD Athlon 64 processor, shown in Figure 5-2, is available in Socket 754 and Socket 939 variants.
As its name indicates, the Athlon 64 supports 64-bit software, although only a tiny percentage of Athlon 64 owners run 64-bit software.
Fortunately, the Athlon 64 is equally at home running the 32-bit operating systems and applications software that most of us use.
Like the Sempron, the Athlon 64 has a memory controller built onto the processor die, rather than depending on a memory controller that's part of the chipset.
The upside of this design decision is that Athlon 64 memory performance is excellent.
The downside is that supporting a new type of memory, such as DDR2, requires a processor redesign.
Socket 754 models have a single-channel PC3200 DDR-SDRAM memory controller versus the dual-channel controller in Socket 939 models, so Socket 939 models running at the same clock speed and with the same size L2 cache offer somewhat higher performance.
For example, AMD designates a Socket 754 Newcastle-core Athlon 64 with 512 KB of L2 cache running at 2.
NUMBERS LIE The model numbers of Athlon and aliens slot and Sempron processors are scaled differently.
For example, the Socket 754 Sempron 3100+ runs at 1800 MHz and has 256 KB of cache, and the Socket 754 Athlon 64 2800+ runs at the same clock speed and types of processor sockets and slots twice as much cache.
Despite the lower model number, the Athlon 64 2800+ is somewhat faster than the Sempron 3100+.
Although AMD hotly denies it, most industry observers believe that AMD intends Athlon 64 model numbers to be compared with Pentium 4 clock speeds and Sempron model numbers with Celeron clock speeds.
Of course, Intel also types of processor sockets and slots their recent types of processor sockets and slots by model number rather than clock types of processor sockets and slots, confusing matters even further.
For more information about Athlon 64 processor models, visit.
Intel Pentium 4 The Pentium 4, shown in Figure 5-3, is Intel's flagship processor, and is available in Socket 478 and Socket 775.
Unlike AMD which sometimes uses the same Athlon 64 model number to designate four or more different processors with different clock speeds, L2 cache sizes, and sockets Intel uses a numbering scheme that identifies each model unambiguously.
For example, a Socket 478 Northwood-core Pentium 4 processor operating at a core speed of 2.
Socket 775 Pentium 4 types of processor sockets and slots belong to one of types of processor sockets and slots series.
All 500-series processors use the Prescott-core and have 1 MB of L2 cache.
All 600-series processors use the Prescott 2M core and have 2 MB of L2 cache.
Intel uses the second number of the model number to indicate relative clock speed.
A "J" following a 500-series model number for example, 560J indicates that the processor supports the XDB feature, but not EM64T 64-bit support.
If a 500-series model number ends in 1 for example, 571 that model supports both the XDB feature and EM64T 64-bit processing.
All 600-series processors support both XDB and EM64T.
For more information about Pentium 4 processor models, visit.
These processors the AMD Athlon 64 FX, the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition, and the Intel Pentium Extreme Edition are targeted at the gaming and enthusiast market, and offer at best marginally faster performance than the fastest mainstream models.
In fact, the performance bump is generally so small that we think anyone who buys one of these processors has more dollars than sense.
If you're considering buying one of these outrageously expensive processors, do yourself a favor.
Either that, or keep the extra money in the bank.
Dual-core processors By early 2005, AMD and Intel had both pushed their processor cores to about the fastest possible speeds, and it had become clear that the only practical way to increase processor performance significantly was to use two processors.
Although it's possible to build systems with two physical processors, doing that introduces many complexities, not least a doubling of the already-high power consumption and heat production.
AMD, later followed by Intel, chose to go dual-core.
Combining two cores in one processor isn't exactly the same thing as doubling the speed of one processor.
For one thing, there is overhead involved in managing the two cores that doesn't exist for a single processor.
Also, in a single-tasking environment, a program thread runs no faster on a dual-core processor than it would on a single-core processor, https://fablabs.ru/and/deposit-skins-and-upgrade.html doubling the number of cores by no means doubles application performance.
But in a multitasking environment, where many programs and their threads are competing for processor time, the availability of a second types of processor sockets and slots core means that one thread can run on one core while a second thread runs on the second core.
The upshot is that a dual-core processor typically provides 25% to 75% higher performance than a similar single-core processor if you multitask heavily.
Dual-core performance for a single application is essentially unchanged unless the application is designed to support threading, which many processor-intensive applications are.
For example, a web browser uses threading to keep the user interface responsive even when it's performing a network operation.
Even if you were running only unthreaded applications, though, you'd see some performance benefit from a dual-core processor.
This is true because an operating system, such as Windows XP, that supports dual-core processors automatically allocates different processes to each core.
AMD Athlon 64 X2 The AMD Athlon 64 X2, shown in Figure 5-4, has several things going for it, including high performance, relatively low power requirements and heat production, and compatibility with most existing Socket 939 motherboards.
Fortunately, by late 2005 AMD had begun to ship more reasonably priced dual-core models, although availability is limited.
Intel Pentium D The announcement of AMD's Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processor caught Intel unprepared.
Under the gun, Intel took a cruder approach to making a dual-core processor.
Rather than build an integrated dual-core processor as AMD had with its Athlon 64 X2 processors, Intel essentially slapped two slower Pentium 4 cores on one substrate and called it the Pentium D dual-core processor.
The 800-series 90 nm Smithfield-core Pentium D, shown in Figure 5-5, is a stop-gap kludge for Intel, designed to counter the AMD Athlon 64 X2 until Intel can bring to market its real answer, the dual-core 65 nm Presler-core processor, which is likely to be designated the 900-series Pentium D.
The Presler-based dual-core processors will be fully integrated, compatible with existing dual-core Intel-compatible motherboards, and feature reduced power consumption, lower heat output, twice as much L2 cache, and considerably higher performance.
Reading the foregoing, you might think we had only contempt for the 800-series Pentium D processors.
In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.
They're a kludge, yes, but they're a reasonably cheap, very effective kludge, assuming that you have a motherboard that supports them.
We extensively tested an early sample of the least expensive 800-series Pentium D, the 820.
The 820 runs at 2.
As we added more and more processes, the difference became clear.
Instead of bogging down, as the single-core Prescott would have done, the Pentium D provided snappy response to the foreground process.
For more information about Pentium D processor models, visit.
AMD and Intel processor summaries Table 5-2 lists the important characteristics of current AMD processors, including the special features they support.
Table 5-3 lists the important characteristics of current Intel processors, including the special features they support.
SPECIAL FEATURES Special features are not always implemented across an entire line of processors.
For example, we list the Pentium D 8XX-series processors as supporting EM64T, SSE3, EIST, and dual core.
At the time we wrote this, three Pentium D 8XX models were available: the 2.
The 830 and 840 models support all of the special features listed.
The 820 model supports EM64T, SSE3, and dual-core operation, but not EIST.
If a special feature listed as being supported by a particular line of processors is important to you, verify that it is supported in the exact processor model you intend to buy.

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Heatsinks for some processor types clip directly to the processor socket, and if the spring-loaded arm holding the heatsink is not released properly, the socket can be damaged. Socket 478, Socket 603/604, Socket 754, and Sockets 939 and 940 use heatsinks that are mounted on external supports, making installation and removal easier and safer.


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CPU interfaces - motherboard slots and sockets for AMD and Intel processors
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Resurrecting a Broken Motherboard – Bent Socket Pins

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Eg: Pentium-III Processors Baby AT Motherboards: 3. Baby AT Motherboards have the combination of XT and AT. They have both slot type processor sockets and PGA processor sockets, SD Ram slots and DDR Ram slots, PCI slots and ISA slots, 12 Pin power connector and 20Pin power connector and Ports.


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CPU interfaces - motherboard slots and sockets for AMD and Intel processors
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How to identify what slot type a particular PC card is? - Super User
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The key to this has been standardisation, which has promoted competition and, in turn, technical innovation.
The heart of a PC system — the processor — is no different in this respect than any other component or device.
A consequence of this is that it enabled rival manufacturers to design and develop processors that would work in the same system.
The rest is history.
In essence, a CPU is a flat square sliver of silicon with circuits etched on its surface.
This chip is linked to connector pins and the whole contraption encased some form of packaging — either ceramic or plastic — with pins running along the flat underside or along one edge.
The CPU package is connected to a motherboard via some form of CPU interface, either a slot or a socket.
For many years the socket style of CPU was dominant.
Then both major PC chip manufacturers switched to a slot style of interface.
After a relatively short period of time they both changed their minds and the socket was back in favour!
The older 386, 486, classic Pentium and Pentium MMX processors came in a flat square package with an array of pins on the underside — called Pin Grid Array PGA — which plugged into a socket-style CPU interface on the motherboard.
The earliest such interface for which many motherboards and working systems remain to this day — not least because it supported CPUs from so many different chip manufacturers — is Socket 7.
Originally developed by Intel as the successor to Socket 5, it was the same size but had different electrical characteristics including a system bus that ran at 66MHz.
Socket 7 was the interface used by most Pentium systems from the 75MHz version and beyond.
To accommodate L2 cache — in the package but not on the core — this contained up to three separate dice mounted on a small circuit board.
The complicated arrangement proved extremely expensive to manufacture and was quickly abandoned.
With the introduction of their Pentium II CPU, Intel switched to a much cheaper solution for packaging chips that consisted of more than a single die.
Internally, the SECC package was really a circuit board containing the core processor chip and cache memory chips.
The cartridge had pins running along one side which enabled it to be mounted perpendicularly to the motherboard — in much the same way as the graphics or sound card is mounted into an expansion slot — into an interface that was referred to as Slot 1.
The up to two 256KB L2 cache chips ran at half the CPU speed.
When Intel reverted — from the Pentium III Coppermine core — to locating L2 cache on the processor die, they continued to use cacheless Slot 1 packaging for a while for reasons of compatibility.
This necessitated a bigger heatsink which in turn required a taller cartridge.
The solution was Slot 2, which also sported more connectors than Slot 1, to support a more aggressive multi-processor protocol amongst other features.
When Intel stopped making its MMX processor in mid-1998 it effectively left the Socket 7 field entirely to its competitors, principally AMD and Cyrix.
With the co-operation of both motherboard and chipset manufacturers their ambitious plans for extending the life of the legacy form factor was largely successful.
AMD referred to this as the Super7 platform initiative, and its aim was to keep the platform viable throughout 1999 and into the year 2000.
Developed by AMD and key industry partners, the Super7 platform supercharged Socket 7 by adding support for 100MHz and 95MHz bus interfaces and the Accelerated Graphics Port AGP specification and by delivering other leading-edge features, including 100MHz SDRAM, USB, Ultra DMA and ACPI.
This was physically identical to Slot 1, but it communicated types of processor sockets and slots the connector using a completely different protocol — originally created by Digital and called EV6 — which allowed RAM to CPU transfers via a 200MHz FSB.
Featuring an SECC slot with 242 leads, Slot A used a Voltage Regulator Module VRMputting the onus on the CPU to set the correct operating voltage — which in the case of Slot A CPUs was a range between 1.
Slot-based processors are overkill for single-chip dies.
Consequently, in early 1999 Intel moved back to a square PGA packaging for its single die, integrated L2 cache, Celeron range of CPUs.
Specifically these used a PPGA 370 packaging, which connected to the motherboard https://fablabs.ru/and/olg-slots-and-casinos-in-ontario.html a Socket 370 CPU interface.
Socket 370 has proved to be one of the more enduring socket types, not least because of the popularity of the cheap and overclockable Celeron range.
Indeed, Intel is not the only processor manufacturer which produces CPUs that require Socket 370 — the Cyrix MIII VIA C3 range also utilising it.
The sudden abandonment of Slot 1 in favour of Socket 370 created a need for adapters to allow PPGA-packaged CPUs to be used in Slot 1 motherboards.
Fortunately, the industry responded, with Abit being the first off the mark with its original SlotKET adapter.
Many were soon to follow, ensuring that Slot 1 motherboard owners were not left high and dry.
A Slot 1 to Socket 370 converter that enables Socket 370-based CPUs to be plugged into a Slot 1 motherboard was also produced.
The advantage with this packaging design is that the hottest part of the chip is located on the side that is away from the motherboard, thereby improving heat dissipation.
The FC-PGA2 package adds an Integral Heat Spreader, improving heat conduction still further.
Specifically, FC-PGA processors require motherboards that support VRM 8.
With the advent of the Athlon Thunderbird and Spitfire cores, the chipmaker followed the lead of the industry leader by also reverting to a PPGA-style packaging for its new family of Athlon and Duron processors.
This connects to a motherboard via what AMD calls a Socket A interface.
This has 462 pin holes — of which 453 are used by the CPU — and supports both the 200MHz EV6 bus and newer 266MHz EV6 bus.
With the release of the Pentium 4 in late 2000, Intel introduced yet another socket to its line-up, namely Socket 423.
Indicative of the trend for processors to consume ever decreasing amounts types of processor sockets and slots power, the PGA-style Socket 423 has a VRM operational range of between 1.
Socket 423 had been in use for only a matter of months when Intel muddied the waters still further with the announcement of the new Socket 478 form factor.
The principal difference between this and its predecessor is that drilled and rotors slotted brake newer format socket features a much more densely packed arrangement of pins known as a micro Pin Grid Array µPGA interface, which allows both the size of the CPU itself and the space occupied by the interface socket on the motherboard to be significantly reduced.
Socket 478 was introduced to accommodate the 0.
In the autumn of 2003 AMD brought two versions of their K8 architecture to the desktop market, branded the Athlon 64 and the Athlon 64 FX.
The new chips signalled the end of the line for the venerable Socket A CPU interface.
The Athlon 64 saw the introduction of Socket 754 and has a single-channel integrated memory controller.
The summer of 2004 saw the Athlon 64 line converged to a new platform, Socket 939.
Importantly, types of processor sockets and slots allowed both the consumer and high-end models to use unbuffered memory in a dual channel configurations.
At about the same time, Intel unveiled major changes in its platform technology, including new PCI Express compatible chipsets and the innovative LGA775 CPU interface also referred to as Socket T.
Socket 2 238-pin A minor upgrade from Socket 1 that supported all the same chips.
Additionally supported a Pentium OverDrive.
Socket 3 237-pin Operated at 5 volts, but had the added capability of operating at 3.
Supported all of the Socket 2 chips with the addition of the 5×86.
Considered the last of the 486 sockets.
Socket 4 273-pin The first socket designed for use with Pentium class processors.
Beginning with the Pentium-75, Intel moved to the 3.
Socket 5 320-pin Operated at 3.
Not compatible with later chips because of their requirement for an additional pin.
Socket 6 235-pin Designed for use with 486 CPUs, this was an enhanced version of Socket 3 supporting operation at 3.
Barely used since it appeared at a time when the 486 was about to be superseded by the Pentium.
The interface used for all Pentium clones with a 66MHz bus.
Socket 8 387-pin Used exclusively by the Intel Pentium Pro, the socket proved extremely expensive to manufacture and was quickly dropped in favour of a cartridge-based design.
Slot 1 242-way connector The circuit board inside the package had up to 512KB of L1 cache on it — consisting of two 256KB chips — which ran at half the CPU speed.
Used by Intel Pentium II, Pentium III and Celeron CPUs.
Slot 2 330-way connector Similar to Slot 1, but https://fablabs.ru/and/stop-and-step-slots.html the capacity to hold up to 2MB of L2 cache running at the full CPU speed.
Slot A 242-way connector AMD interface mechanically compatible with Slot 1 but which using a completely different electrical interface.
Introduced with the original Athlon CPU.
Socket 370 370-pin Began to replace Slot 1 on the Celeron range from early 1999.
Also used by Pentium III Coppermine and Tualatin CPUs in variants known as FC-PGA and FC-PGA2 respectively.
Socket A 462-pin AMD interface introduced with the first Athlon processors Thunderbird with on-die L2 cache.
Includes an Integral Heat Spreader, which both protects the die and provides a surface to which large heat sinks can be attached.
Socket 603 603-pin The connector for Pentium 4 Xeon CPUs.
The additional pins are for providing more power to future CPUs with large on-die or even off-die L3 caches, and possibly for accommodating inter-processor-communication signals for systems with multiple CPUs.
Socket 478 478-pin Introduced in anticipation of the introduction of the 0.
Its micro Pin Grid Array µPGA interface allows both the size of the CPU itself and the space occupied by the socket on the motherboard to be significantly reduced.
Targeted at budget desktop and mobile 64 bit computing.
Subsequently replaced for use by the latter by Socket 939, which allowed for a less-expensive motherboard option, one with only four layers rather than from six to nine.
The Socket 939 marked the convergence of the mainstream and FX versions of the Athlon 64 CPU, which had types of processor sockets and slots used different interfaces, the Socket 754 and Socket 940 respectively.
Similar to a pin grid array PGAthe connection between LGA775 chip packaging and the processor chip is via an array of contacts rather than pins to sockets providing better power distribution to the processor.
Used for some Pentium 4, Pentium D, Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad CPUs.
The LGA771 supports the Dual Core Xeon Dempsey and Woodcrest, Quad Core Clovertown, and Core 2 Extreme processors.
Socket 479 479-pin Also referred to as the mPGA479M socket, Socket 479 https://fablabs.ru/and/difference-between-slot-and-slat-in-aircraft.html best known as the CPU socket for the Intel Pentium M mobile processor.
The format was also used for desktop PCs, Asus making a types of processor sockets and slots board which allowed Socket 479 CPUs to be used in selected desktop motherboards.
Intel subsequently announced a new Socket 479 with a revised pinout for its new generation of Core CPUs.
Socket F 1207-pin Released August 2006, AMD created the Socket F as a socket 940 replacement for its server line processors, particularly the Opteron range, though types of processor sockets and slots also the high range Athlon 64 FX series of processors.
Socket AM2+ 940-pin Released November 2007, this step up from the socket AM2 improved HyperTransport support and energy efficiency, though only on AM2+ compatible chips with fully AM2+ motherboards.
Seen as a halfway house to socket AM3, takeup on the socket was arguably disappointing.
DDR3 RAM is required for this socket.
Each of these will need to be connected to the appropriate location on the motherboard, or to a motherboard expansion card.
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They began back in the 1980s with the humble CD, which was great for music, computer software and data.
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A CPU socket or CPU slot is an electrical component that attaches to a printed circuit board (PCB) and is designed to house a microprocessor.It is a special type of integrated circuit socket designed for very high pin counts.


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How to describe the different types of RAM slots - Quora
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Computer Processor Types - iFixit
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Computer Processor Types A few years ago, choosing a processor was pretty straightforward.
AMD and Intel each produced two series of processors, a mainstream line and a budget line.
Each company used only one processor socket, and there was a limited range of processor speeds available.
If you wanted an Intel processor, you might have a dozen mainstream models and a half-dozen budget models to choose among.
The same was true of AMD.
OEM Versus Retail-Boxed To further confuse matters, most AMD and Intel processors are available in two types of packaging, called OEM and retail-boxed.
OEM processor packages include only the bare processor and usually provide only a 90-day warranty.
Retail-boxed processors include the processor, a compatible CPU cooler, and a longer warranty, typically three years.
A retail-boxed processor is usually the better deal.
It typically costs only a few dollars more than the OEM version of the same processor, and the bundled CPU cooler is usually worth more than the price difference.
But if you plan to install an after-market CPU cooler for example, because you types of processor sockets and slots upgrading your system to be as quiet as possible it may make sense to buy the OEM processor.
Nowadays, choosing a processor isn't as simple.
AMD and Intel now make literally scores of different processor models.
Each company now offers several lines of processors, which differ in clock speed, L2 cache, socket type, host-bus speed, special features supported, and other characteristics.
Even the model names are confusing.
AMD, for example, has offered at least five different processor models under the same name Athlon 64 3200+.
An Intel Celeron model number that ends in J fits Socket 775, and the same model number without the J designates the same processor for Socket 478.
A Pentium 4 processor model number that ends in J says nothing about the socket type it is designed for, but indicates that the processor supports the execute-disable bit feature.
AMD and Intel each offer the three categories of processors described in the following sections.
Budget processors Budget processors give up a bit of performance in exchange for a lower price.
At any given time, AMD or Intel's fastest available budget processor is likely to have about 85% of the performance of their slowest mainstream model.
Budget processors are more than sufficient for routine computing tasks.
After all, today's budget processor was yesterday's mainstream processor and last week's performance processor.
Budget processors are often the best choice for a system upgrade, because their lower clock speeds and power consumption make it more likely that they'll be compatible with an older motherboard.
The Sempron replaced the discontinued Socket A Duron processor in 2004, and the obsolescent Socket A Athlon XP processor in 2005.
Various Sempron models are available in the obsolescent Socket A and in the same Socket 754 used by some Athlon 64 models.
AMD actually packages types of processor sockets and slots different processors under the Sempron name.
A Socket A Sempron, also called a K7 Sempron, is in fact a re-badged Athlon XP processor.
A Socket 754 Sempron, shown in Figure 5-1 is also called a K8 Sempron, and is really a cut-down Athlon 64 model running at a lower clock speed with a smaller L2 cache and a single-channel memory controller rather than the dual-channel memory controller of the Athlon 64.
Early Sempron models had no support for 64-bit processing.
Recent Sempron models include 64-bit support, although the practicality of running 64bit software on a Sempron is questionable.
Still, like the Athlon 64, the Sempron also runs 32-bit software very efficiently, so you can think of the 64-bit support as future-proofing.
If you have a Socket 462 A or Socket 754 motherboard in your system, the Sempron offers an excellent upgrade path.
You'll need to verify compatibility of your motherboard with the specific Sempron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the Sempron.
For more information about Sempron processor models, visit.
Intel Celeron For many types of processor sockets and slots, the Intel Celeron processor was the poor stepsister, offering too little performance at too high a price.
Cynical observers believed that the only reason Intel sold any Celeron processors at all was that system makers types of processor sockets and slots the Intel name on their boxes without having and egg breakfast ideas pay the higher price for an Intel mainstream processor.
That all changed when Intel introduced their Celeron D models, which are now available for Socket 478 and Socket 775 motherboards.
While Celeron D models are still slower than Semprons dollar-for-dollar, the disparity is nowhere near as large as in years past.
Like the Sempron, Celeron models are available with 64-bit support, delay of pure aloha and slotted aloha again the practicality of running 64-bit software on an entry-level processor is questionable.
Once again, it's important to verify the compatibility of your motherboard with the specific Celeron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the Celeron.
AVOID NON-D CELERON PROCESSORS Celeron processors without the "D" are based on the Northwood core and have only 128 KB of L2 cache.
These processors have very poor performance, and unfortunately remain available for sale.
The Celeron D models are based on the Prescott-core, and have 256 KB of L2 cache.
For more information about Celeron processor models, visit.
A mainstream processor may be a good upgrade choice if you need more performance than a budget processor offers and are willing to pay the additional cost.
However, depending on your motherboard, a mainstream processor may not be an option even if you are willing to pay the types of processor sockets and slots cost.
Mainstream processors consume considerably more click the following article than most budget processors, often too much to be used on older motherboards.
Also, mainstream processors often use more recent cores, larger L2 caches, and other features that may or may not be compatible with an older motherboard.
An older power supply may not provide enough power for a current mainstream processor, and the new processor may require faster memory than is currently installed.
If you intend to upgrade to a mainstream processor, carefully verify compatibility of the processor, motherboard, power supply, and memory before you buy the processor.
AMD Athlon 64 The AMD Athlon 64 processor, shown in Figure 5-2, is available in Socket 754 and Socket 939 variants.
As its name indicates, the Athlon 64 supports 64-bit software, although only a tiny percentage of Athlon 64 owners run 64-bit software.
Fortunately, the Athlon 64 is equally at home running the 32-bit operating systems and applications software that most of us use.
Like the Sempron, the Athlon 64 has a memory controller built onto the processor die, rather than depending on a memory controller that's part of the chipset.
The upside of this design decision is that Athlon 64 memory performance is excellent.
The downside is that supporting a new type of memory, such as DDR2, requires a processor redesign.
Socket 754 models have a single-channel PC3200 DDR-SDRAM memory controller versus the dual-channel controller in Socket 939 models, so Socket 939 models running at the same clock speed and with the same size L2 cache offer somewhat higher performance.
For example, AMD designates a Socket 754 Newcastle-core Athlon 64 with 512 KB of L2 cache running at 2.
NUMBERS LIE The model numbers of Athlon 64 and Sempron processors are scaled differently.
For example, the Socket 754 Sempron 3100+ runs at 1800 MHz and has 256 KB of cache, and the Socket 754 Athlon 64 2800+ runs at the same clock speed and has twice as much cache.
Despite the lower model number, the Athlon 64 2800+ is somewhat faster than the Sempron 3100+.
Although AMD hotly denies it, most industry observers believe that AMD intends Athlon 64 model numbers to be compared with Pentium 4 clock speeds and Sempron model numbers with Celeron clock speeds.
Of course, Intel also designates their recent processors by model number rather than clock speed, confusing matters even further.
For more information about Athlon 64 processor models, visit.
Intel Pentium 4 The Pentium 4, shown in Figure 5-3, is Intel's flagship processor, and is available in Socket 478 and Socket 775.
Unlike AMD which sometimes uses the same Athlon 64 model number to designate four or more different processors with different clock speeds, L2 cache sizes, and sockets Intel uses a numbering scheme that identifies each model unambiguously.
For example, a Socket 478 Northwood-core Pentium 4 processor operating at a core speed of 2.
Socket 775 Pentium 4 models belong to one of two series.
All 500-series processors use the Prescott-core and have 1 MB of L2 cache.
All 600-series processors use the Prescott 2M core and have 2 MB of L2 cache.
Intel uses the second number of the model number to indicate relative clock speed.
A "J" following a 500-series model number for example, 560J indicates that the processor supports the XDB feature, but not EM64T 64-bit support.
If a 500-series model number ends in 1 for example, 571 that model supports both the XDB feature and EM64T 64-bit processing.
All 600-series processors support both XDB and EM64T.
For more information about Pentium 4 processor models, visit.
These processors the AMD Athlon 64 FX, the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition, and the Intel Pentium Extreme Edition are targeted at the gaming and enthusiast market, and offer at best marginally faster performance than the fastest mainstream models.
In fact, the performance bump is generally so small that we think anyone who buys one of these processors has more dollars than sense.
If you're considering buying one of these outrageously expensive processors, do yourself a favor.
Either that, or keep the extra money in the bank.
Dual-core processors By early 2005, AMD and Intel had both pushed their processor cores to about the fastest possible speeds, and it had become clear that the only practical way to increase processor performance significantly was to use two processors.
Although it's possible to build systems with two physical processors, doing that introduces many complexities, not least a doubling of the already-high power consumption and heat production.
AMD, later followed by Intel, chose to go dual-core.
Combining two cores in one processor isn't exactly the same thing as doubling the speed of one processor.
For one thing, there is overhead involved in managing the two cores that doesn't exist for a single processor.
Also, in a single-tasking environment, a program thread runs no faster on a dual-core processor than it would on a single-core processor, so doubling the number of cores by no means doubles application performance.
But in a multitasking environment, where many programs and their threads are competing for processor time, the availability of a second processor core means that one thread can run on one core while a second thread runs on the second core.
The upshot is that a dual-core processor typically provides 25% to 75% higher performance than a similar single-core processor if you multitask heavily.
Dual-core performance for a single application is essentially unchanged unless the application is designed to support threading, which many processor-intensive applications are.
For example, a web browser uses threading to keep the user interface responsive even when it's performing a network operation.
Even if you were running only unthreaded applications, though, you'd see some performance benefit from a dual-core processor.
This is true because an operating system, such as Windows XP, that slots and casinos toronto olg dual-core processors automatically allocates different processes to each core.
AMD Athlon 64 X2 The AMD Athlon 64 X2, shown in Figure 5-4, has several things going for it, including high performance, relatively low power requirements and heat production, and compatibility with most existing Socket 939 motherboards.
Fortunately, by late 2005 AMD had begun to ship more reasonably priced dual-core models, although availability is limited.
Intel Pentium D The announcement of AMD's Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processor caught Intel unprepared.
Under the gun, Intel took a cruder approach to making a dual-core processor.
Rather than build an integrated dual-core processor as AMD had with its Athlon 64 X2 processors, Intel essentially slapped two slower Pentium 4 cores on one substrate and called it the Pentium D dual-core processor.
The 800-series 90 nm Smithfield-core Pentium D, shown in Figure 5-5, is a stop-gap kludge for Intel, designed to counter the AMD Athlon 64 X2 until Intel can bring to market its real answer, the dual-core 65 nm Presler-core processor, which is likely to be designated the 900-series Pentium D.
The Presler-based dual-core processors will be fully integrated, compatible with existing dual-core Intel-compatible motherboards, and feature reduced power consumption, lower heat output, twice as much L2 cache, and considerably higher performance.
Reading the foregoing, you might think we had only contempt for the 800-series Pentium D processors.
In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.
They're a kludge, yes, but they're a reasonably cheap, very effective kludge, assuming that you have a motherboard that supports them.
We extensively tested an early sample of the least expensive 800-series Pentium D, the types of processor sockets and slots />The 820 runs at 2.
As we added more and more processes, the difference became clear.
Instead of bogging down, as the single-core Prescott would have done, mountaineer casino racetrack and resort Pentium D provided snappy response to the foreground process.
For more information about Pentium D processor models, visit.
AMD and Intel processor summaries Table 5-2 lists the important characteristics of current AMD processors, including the special features they support.
Table 5-3 lists the important characteristics of current Intel processors, including the special features they support.
SPECIAL FEATURES Special features are not always implemented across an entire line 18 and in wa processors.
For example, we list the Pentium D 8XX-series processors as supporting EM64T, SSE3, EIST, and dual core.
At the time we wrote this, three Pentium D 8XX models were available: the 2.
The 830 and 840 models support all of the special features listed.
The 820 model supports EM64T, SSE3, and dual-core operation, but not EIST.
If a special feature listed as being supported by a particular line of processors is important to you, verify that it is supported in the exact processor model you intend to buy.

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Intel and AMD Processors. Furthermore, both AMD and Intel also create specific socket types for certain processors. In fact, Intel often creates sockets for processors that are incompatible with the previous generation or processors. The difference between certain sockets may not be apparent just from sight alone.


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Some versions of the Celeron and Celeron D also use Socket LGA 775.
Socket LGA 775, unlike earlier Intel processor sockets, uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
LGA uses gold pads called lands on the bottom of the processor to replace the pins used in PGA packages.
It allows for much greater clamping forces please click for source a load plate with a locking lever, with greater stability and improved thermal transfer better cooling.
The first LGA processors were the Pentium II and Celeron processors in 1997; in those processors, an LGA chip was soldered on the Slot-1 cartridge.
LGA is a recycled version of what was previously called leadless chip carrier LCC packaging.
This was used way back on the 286 processor in 1984, and it had gold lands around the edge only.
There were far fewer pins back then.
In other ways, LGA is simply a modified version of ball grid array BGAwith gold lands replacing the solder balls, making it more suitable for socketed rather than soldered applications.
Socket LGA 775 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA775 Socket T The release lever on the left raises the load plate out of the way to permit the processor to be placed over the contacts.
Socket LGA 1156 Socket LGA 1156 also known as Socket H was introduced in September 2009 and was designed to support Intel Core i x-series processors featuring an integrated chipset northbridge, including a dual-channel DDR3 memory controller and optional integrated graphics.
Socket LGA 1156 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1156 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA1156 Socket H Because the processor includes the chipset northbridge, Socket LGA 1156 is designed to interface between a processor and a Platform Controller Hub PCHwhich is the new name used for the southbridge component in supporting 5x series chipsets.
DMI in this case is essentially a modified PCI Express x4 v2.
When processors with integrated graphics are used, the Flexible Display Interface carries digital display types of processor sockets and slots from the GPU in the processor to the display interface circuitry in the PCH.
Depending on the motherboard, the display interface can support DisplayPort, High Definition Multimedia Interface HDMIDigital Visual Interface DVIor Video Graphics Array VGA connectors.
Socket LGA 1366 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1366 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA1366 Socket B Socket LGA 1366 is designed to interface between a processor and an IOH, which is the new name used for the northbridge component in supporting 5 x-series chipsets.
QPI transfers two bytes per cycle at either 4.
LGA 1366 is designed for high-end PC, workstation, or server use.
It supports configurations with multiple processors.
Socket LGA 1155 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1155 uses the same cover plate as Socket 1156, but is not interchangeable with it.
LGA 1155 supports up to 16 PCIe 3.
Socket LGA 1155 is shown in the figure below.
slot questions and answers LGA1155 Socket H2 before installing a processor.
LGA 2011 supports 40 PCIe 3.
Socket LGA 2011 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 2011 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA2011 before installing a processor.
Ugggh, got to page two before being disgusted this time.
This author is back to writing fiction.
The Pentium 5th generation, in case the author didn't know, thus the "Pent"DID execute x86 instructions.
It was the Pentium Pro that didn't.
That was the sixth generation.
CISC and RISC are not arbitary terms, and RISC is better when you have a lot of memory, that's why Intel and AMD use it for x86.
They can't execute x86 instructions effectively, so they break it down to RISC type operations, and then execute it.
They pay the penalty of adding additional stages in the pipeline which slows down the processor greater branch mispredict penaltyadds size, and uses power.
If they are equal, why would anyone take this penalty?
Being superscalar has nothing to do with being RISC or CISC.
Admittedly, the terms aren't carved in stone, and the term can be misleading, as it's not necessarily the number of instructions that defines RISC.
Even so, there are clear differences.
RISC has fixed length instructions.
CISC generally does not.
RISC has much simpler memory addressing modes.
The main difference is, RISC does not have microcoding to execute instructions - everything is done in hardware.
Obviously, this strongly implies much simpler, easier to execute instructions, which make it superior today.
However, code density is less for RISC, and that was very important in the 70s and early 80s when memory was not so large.
Even now, better density means better performance, since you'll hit the faster caches more often.
This article is also wrong about 3D Now!
It was not introduced as an alternative to SSE, SSE was introduced as an alternative to 3D Now!
In reality, 3D Now!
Games, or other software that could use 3D Now!
It was relatively small to implement, and in the correct workloads could show dramatic improvements.
But, of course, almost no one used it.
The remarks about the dual bus are inaccurate.
The reason was that motherboard bus speeds were not able to keep up with microprocessors speeds starting with the 486DX2.
Intel suffered the much slower bus speed to the L2 cache on the Pentium and Pentium MMX, but moved the L2 cache on the same processor package but not on the same die with the Pentium Pro.
The purpose of having the separate buses was that one could access the L2 cache at a much higher speed; it wasn't limited to the 66 MHz bus speed of the motherboard.
The Pentium Pro was never intended to be mainstream, and was too expensive, so Intel moved the L2 cache onto the Slot 1 cartridge, and ran it at half bus speed, which in any case was still much faster than the memory bus.
That was the main reason they went to the two buses.
That was as far as I bothered to read this.
It's a pity people can't actually do fact checking when they write books, and make up weird stories that only have a passing resemblance to reality.
And then act like someone winning types of processor sockets and slots misinformation is lucky.
Good grief, what a perverse world.
Yes you are correct on the bus issue.
VESA local bus was designed to overcome the limitations of the ISA bus.
As for the reason Intel went with a slot design for the This web page 2 was to prevent AMD from using it.
You can patent and trademark a slot design.
As for the Pentium Pro, read more had issues from handling 16bit x86 instruction sets.
The solution was to program around it.
The was an inherent computational flaw with the Pentium Pro too.
I don't think there is a single page that isn't piled with inaccurate or incomplete information.
Kinda nice for generic info, was hoping for more explanation of some of the finer points of cpu architecture Perhaps the most important thing to note from this is just how clever some of our users are.
Not to be anal but aren't all Core i3 processors, types of processor sockets and slots cores 2.
Some have Hyper-Threading to make it like 4 cores.
The last chart above should read Core i3 - 2 cores.
Not to be anal but aren't all Core i3 processors, dual cores 2.
Some have Hyper-Threading to make it like 4 cores.
The last chart above should read Core i3 - 2 cores.
Llano is not based on Bulldozer but rather is based on a slightly improved K10 typically dubbed "K10.
Do AMD processors also feature reprogrammable microcode?
I'm using an FX-8350 and before it I was using a Phenom II X4 925 unlocked X3 720.
Yeah, this wasn't particularly well researched.
Quite a few minor mistakes, not to mention it reads like an Intel advertisement, with AMD's contribution to modern PCs being either downplayed or omitted entirely.
After seeing that story they had up a couple days ago about HUBS where the person actually talked about what SWITCHES do, not hubs.
Since then I make sure I come into Tomshardware articles expecting stuff to be incorrect.
It makes me sad, I types of processor sockets and slots to come here for new tech info but now I'm not so sure.
I worked for Intel during the time period that they released the Types of processor sockets and slots MMX processors.
They told us that MMX stood johnny casino and the gamblers hound dog Multi Media eXtensions.
These instructions are faster and more accurate than x87 floating-point math.
X87 knows and uses 80 bit floating point data internally while SEE and AVX can only use 64 bit floating point data.
This sentence will be true if 128 bit precision is implemented in the future.

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A CPU socket is specifically designed for a particular CPU and is usually not interchangeable with other types of processors. In many cases, manufacturers classify sockets into groups. A socket may be identified on its side by a three-five digit ID number. The ID number ensures that the CPU uses the correct CPU socket.


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Which technology do you prefer: Slot or socket?. it’s likely you know the difference between socket- and slot-based processors. But just in case you don’t, here is a brief comparison of the.


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First, for desktop: 1. SDRAM. “Synchronous dynamic random-access memory”. It’s working frequency varies from 66MHz to 133MHz. It came as 168 pin DIMM. It had a 64-bit bus, and worked at 3.3V.


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CPU Slot. The CPU slot (also known as a CPU socket) is where the processor is stored on a computer's motherboard. To replace a CPU you will need to raise the socket by lifting a small lever on the side of the socket; then you can gently pull out the CPU hardware. Replace the old CPU with a new one by aligning your new CPU with the socket,...


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Computer Basics What are all the buttons, sockets, and slots used for - Lesson 4.flv

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A CPU socket is specifically designed for a particular CPU and is usually not interchangeable with other types of processors. In many cases, manufacturers classify sockets into groups. A socket may be identified on its side by a three-five digit ID number. The ID number ensures that the CPU uses the correct CPU socket.


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Processor Slots. Slot 1 is a 242-pin slot designed to accept Pentium II, Pentium III, and most Celeron processors. Slot 2, on the other hand, is a more sophisticated 330-pin slot designed for the Pentium II Xeon and Pentium III Xeon processors, which are primarily for workstations and servers.


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Socket 462 a socket Ina CPU socket or CPU slot contains one or more mechanical components providing mechanical and electrical connections between a and a PCB.
This allows for placing and replacing the CPU without soldering.
Common sockets have retention clips that apply a constant force, which must be overcome when a device is inserted.
For chips with a large number of pins, ZIF sockets are preferred.
Common sockets include PGA or LGA.
These designs apply a once either a handle PGA type or a surface plate LGA type is put into place.
This provides superior mechanical retention while avoiding the risk of bending when inserting the chip into the socket.
Certain devices use BGA sockets, although these require soldering and are types of processor sockets and slots not considered user replaceable.
CPU sockets are used on the in and computers.
Because they allow easy swapping of components, they are also used for prototyping new circuits.
Many packages are keyed to ensure the proper insertion of the CPU.
CPUs with a package are inserted into the socket and, if included, the latch is closed.
CPUs with an package are inserted into the socket, the latch plate is flipped into position atop the CPU, and the lever is lowered and locked into place, pressing the CPU's contacts firmly against the socket's lands and ensuring a good connection, as well as increased mechanical stability.
Intel Intel Intel 68 to 132 1.
An adapter is required, or if one is careful, a socket 7 can be pulled off its pins and put onto a socket 5 board, allowing the use of socket 7 processors.
Can accept some of Socket 478 CPU with an adapter 2000 Intel Intel Notebook 495 1.
It is just a re-branded Socket F that doesn't need special RAM, and may have only been used in the Asus L1N64-SLI WS Learn more here />CPUs can work in Socket AM2 AM2 Pkg.
CPUs can work in Socket AM2+ 2007 Intel Notebook 478?
Ivy Bridge supports 40 3.
Using the Xeon focused 2011 socket gives also 4 memory Channels.
Compatible with AMD APUs such as "" 2014 AMD AMD Desktop 721 1.
Depends on DDR4 speed compatible with AMD Epyc processors 2017 AMD Ryzen Threadripper Desktop 4094?
FSB in the later models.
PDF from the original on 2009-12-29.
By using this site, you agree to the and.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the types of processor sockets and slots, a non-profit organization.

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CPU sockets come in two major types -- ball-grid array and pin-grid array. PGA sockets look like a checkerboard with lots of squares.


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Motherboard Components, Slots, Sockets and Connectors for Peripheral and its Uses in Details

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information, pins, pin layouts, and all socket types from Socket 1 to Socket 7 (and including Slot 1) see the Web Resources section. Thereare,ofcourse,architecturaldifferencesbetweenthemaintypesofslot/socket, but the line has become more blurred over the years. For example, the older Socket


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However, often case designs use riser cards and some even have two-slot riser cards, even when the two-slot riser cards are not usable with all the boards. A few boards based around non-x86 processors have a 3.3V PCI slot, and the Mini-ITX 2.0 (2008) boards have a PCI-express ×16 slot.


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Processor Socket And Slot Types. Intel and AMD have created a set of socket and slots for their processors. Each socket or slot is designed to support a different range of original and upgrade processors. The table below shows the designations for the various standard processor sockets/slots and lists the chips that drop into them.


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Some versions of the Celeron and Celeron D also use Socket LGA 775.
Socket LGA 775, unlike earlier Intel processor sockets, uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
LGA uses gold pads called lands on the bottom of the processor to replace the pins click the following article in PGA packages.
It allows for much greater clamping forces via a load plate with a locking lever, with greater stability and improved thermal transfer better cooling.
The first LGA processors were the Pentium II and Celeron processors in 1997; in those processors, an LGA chip was soldered on the Slot-1 cartridge.
LGA is a recycled version of what was previously types of processor sockets and slots leadless chip carrier LCC packaging.
This was used way back on the 286 processor in 1984, and it had gold lands around the edge only.
There were far fewer pins back then.
In other ways, LGA is simply a modified version of ball grid array BGAwith gold lands replacing the solder balls, making it more suitable for socketed rather than soldered applications.
Socket LGA 775 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA775 Socket T The release lever on the left raises the load plate out of the way to permit the processor to be placed over the contacts.
Socket LGA 1156 Socket LGA 1156 also known as Socket H was introduced in September 2009 and was designed to support Intel Core i x-series processors featuring an integrated chipset northbridge, including a dual-channel DDR3 memory controller and optional integrated graphics.
Socket LGA 1156 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1156 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA1156 Socket H Because the processor includes the chipset northbridge, Socket LGA 1156 is designed to interface between a processor and a Platform Controller Hub PCHwhich is the new name used for the southbridge component in supporting 5x series chipsets.
DMI in this case is essentially a modified PCI Express x4 v2.
When processors with integrated graphics are used, the Flexible Display Interface carries digital display data from the GPU in the processor to the display interface circuitry olg and in ontario the PCH.
Depending on the motherboard, the display interface can support DisplayPort, High Definition Multimedia Interface HDMIDigital Visual Interface DVIor Video Graphics Array VGA connectors.
Socket LGA 1366 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1366 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA1366 Socket B Socket LGA 1366 is designed to interface between a processor and an IOH, which is the new name used for the northbridge component in supporting 5 x-series chipsets.
QPI transfers two bytes per cycle at https://fablabs.ru/and/cowboys-and-aliens-slot.html 4.
LGA 1366 is designed for high-end PC, workstation, or server use.
It supports configurations with multiple processors.
Socket LGA 1155 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 1155 uses the same cover plate as Socket 1156, but is not interchangeable with it.
LGA 1155 supports up to 16 PCIe 3.
Socket LGA 1155 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA1155 Socket H2 before installing a processor.
LGA 2011 supports 40 PCIe 3.
Socket LGA 2011 uses a land grid array format, so the pins are on the socket, rather than the processor.
Socket LGA 2011 is shown in the figure below.
Socket LGA2011 before installing a processor.
Ugggh, got to page two before being disgusted this time.
This author is back to writing fiction.
The Pentium 5th generation, in case the author didn't know, thus the "Pent"DID execute x86 instructions.
It was the Pentium Pro that didn't.
That was the sixth generation.
CISC and RISC are not arbitary terms, and RISC is better when you have a lot of memory, that's why Intel and AMD use it for x86.
They can't execute x86 instructions effectively, so they break it down to RISC type operations, and then execute it.
If they are equal, why would anyone take this penalty?
Being superscalar has nothing to do with being RISC or CISC.
Admittedly, the terms aren't carved in stone, and the term can be misleading, as it's not necessarily the number of instructions that defines RISC.
Even so, there are clear differences.
RISC has fixed length instructions.
CISC generally does not.
RISC has much simpler memory addressing modes.
The main difference is, RISC does not have microcoding to execute instructions - everything is done in hardware.
Obviously, types of processor sockets and slots strongly implies much simpler, easier to execute instructions, which make it superior today.
However, code density is less for RISC, and that was very important in the 70s and early 80s when memory was not so large.
Even now, better density means better performance, since you'll hit the faster caches more often.
This article is also wrong about 3D Now!
It was not introduced as an alternative to SSE, SSE was introduced as an alternative to 3D Now!
In reality, 3D Now!
Games, or other software that could use 3D Now!
It was relatively small to implement, and in the correct workloads could show dramatic improvements.
But, of course, almost no one used it.
The remarks about the dual bus are inaccurate.
The reason was that motherboard bus speeds were not and slotted rotors worth it to keep up with microprocessors speeds starting with the 486DX2.
Intel suffered the much slower bus speed to the L2 cache on the Pentium and Pentium MMX, but moved the L2 cache on the same processor package but not on the same die with the Pentium Pro.
The purpose of having the separate buses was that types of processor sockets and slots could access the L2 cache at a much higher speed; it wasn't limited to the 66 MHz bus speed of the motherboard.
The Pentium Pro was never intended to be mainstream, and was too expensive, so Intel moved the L2 cache onto the Slot 1 cartridge, and ran it at half bus speed, which in any case was still much faster than the memory bus.
That was the main reason they went to the two buses.
That was as far as I bothered to read this.
It's a pity people can't actually do fact checking when they write books, and make up weird stories that only have a passing resemblance to reality.
And then act like someone winning this misinformation is lucky.
Good grief, what a perverse world.
Yes you are correct on the bus issue.
VESA local bus was designed to overcome the limitations of the ISA bus.
As for the reason Intel went with a slot design for the Pentium 2 was to prevent AMD from using it.
You can patent and trademark a slot design.
As for the Pentium Pro, it had issues from handling 16bit x86 instruction sets.
The solution was to program around it.
The was an inherent computational flaw with the Pentium Pro too.
I don't types of processor sockets and slots there is a single page that isn't piled with inaccurate or incomplete information.
Kinda nice for generic info, was hoping for more explanation of some of the finer points of cpu architecture Perhaps the most important thing to note from this is just how clever some of our users are.
Not to be anal but aren't all Core i3 processors, dual cores 2.
Some have Hyper-Threading to make it like 4 cores.
The last chart above should read Core i3 - 2 cores.
Not to be anal but aren't all Core i3 processors, dual cores 2.
Some have Hyper-Threading to make it like 4 cores.
The last chart above should read Core i3 - 2 cores.
Llano is not based on Bulldozer but rather is based on a slightly improved K10 typically dubbed "K10.
Do AMD processors also feature reprogrammable microcode?
I'm using an FX-8350 and before it I was using a Phenom II X4 925 unlocked X3 720.
Yeah, this wasn't particularly well researched.
Quite a few minor mistakes, not to mention it reads like an Intel advertisement, with AMD's contribution to modern PCs being either downplayed or omitted entirely.
After seeing that story they had up a couple days ago about HUBS where the person actually talked about what SWITCHES do, not hubs.
article source then I make types of processor sockets and slots I come into Tomshardware articles expecting stuff to be incorrect.
It makes me sad, I used to come here for new tech info but now I'm not so sure.
I worked for Intel during the time period that they released the Pentium MMX processors.
They told us that MMX stood for Multi Media eXtensions.
These instructions are faster and more accurate than x87 floating-point math.
X87 knows and uses 80 bit floating point data internally while SEE and AVX can types of processor sockets and slots use 64 bit floating point data.
This sentence will be true if 128 bit precision is implemented in the future.

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CPU Socket and Slot Information Based on Chris Hare's CPU Sockets Chart and other sources. Some sources differ in details, so this list is not comprehensive - corrections/additions are welcome!


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Intel Sockets: LGA 775, LGA 1156, LGA 1366, And LGA 1155 - Upgrading And Repairing PCs 21st Edition: Processor Features
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Computer Processor Types A few years ago, choosing a processor was pretty straightforward.
AMD and Intel each produced two series of processors, a mainstream line and a budget line.
Each company used only one processor socket, and there was a limited range of processor speeds available.
If you wanted an Intel processor, you might have a dozen mainstream models and a half-dozen budget models to choose among.
The same was true of AMD.
OEM Types of processor sockets and slots Retail-Boxed To further confuse matters, most AMD and Intel processors are available in two types of packaging, called OEM and retail-boxed.
OEM processor packages include only the bare processor and usually provide only a 90-day warranty.
Retail-boxed types of processor sockets and slots include the processor, a compatible CPU cooler, and a longer warranty, typically three years.
A retail-boxed processor is usually the better deal.
It typically costs only a few dollars more than the OEM version of the same processor, and the bundled CPU cooler is usually worth more than the price difference.
But if you plan to install an after-market CPU cooler for example, because you are upgrading your system to be as quiet as possible it may make sense to buy the OEM processor.
Nowadays, choosing a processor isn't as simple.
AMD and Intel now make literally scores of different processor models.
Each company now offers several lines of processors, which differ in clock speed, L2 cache, socket type, host-bus speed, special features supported, and other characteristics.
Even the model names are confusing.
AMD, for example, has offered at least five different processor models under the same name Athlon 64 3200+.
An Intel Celeron model number that ends in J fits Socket 775, and the same model number without the J designates the same processor for Socket 478.
A Pentium 4 processor model number that ends in J says nothing about the socket type it is designed for, but indicates that the processor supports the execute-disable bit feature.
AMD and Intel each offer the three categories of processors described in the see more sections.
Budget processors Budget processors give up a bit of performance in exchange for a lower price.
At any given time, AMD or Intel's fastest available budget processor is likely to have about 85% of the performance of their slowest mainstream model.
Budget processors are more than sufficient for routine computing tasks.
After all, today's budget processor was yesterday's mainstream processor and last week's performance processor.
Budget processors are often the best this web page for a system upgrade, because their lower clock speeds and power consumption make it more likely that they'll be compatible with an older motherboard.
The Sempron replaced the discontinued Socket A Duron processor in 2004, and the obsolescent Socket A Athlon XP processor in 2005.
Various Sempron types of processor sockets and slots are available in the obsolescent Socket A and in the same Socket read article used by some Athlon 64 models.
AMD actually packages two different processors under the Sempron name.
A Socket A Sempron, also called a K7 Sempron, is in fact a re-badged Athlon XP processor.
A Socket 754 Sempron, shown in Figure 5-1 is also called a K8 Sempron, and is really a cut-down Athlon 64 model running at a lower clock speed with a smaller L2 cache and a single-channel memory controller rather than the dual-channel memory controller of the Athlon 64.
Early Sempron models had no support for 64-bit processing.
Recent Sempron models include 64-bit support, although the practicality of running 64bit software on a Sempron is questionable.
If you have a Socket 462 A or Socket 754 motherboard in your system, the Sempron offers an excellent upgrade path.
You'll need to verify compatibility https://fablabs.ru/and/akwesasne-mohawk-casino-and-resort.html your motherboard with the specific Sempron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the Sempron.
For more information about Sempron processor models, visit.
Intel Celeron For many years, the Intel Celeron processor was the poor stepsister, offering too little performance at too high a price.
Cynical observers believed that the only reason Intel sold any Celeron processors at all was that system makers wanted the Intel name on their boxes without having to pay the higher price for an Intel mainstream processor.
That all changed when Intel introduced their Celeron D models, which are now available for Socket 478 and Socket 775 motherboards.
While Celeron D models are still slower than Semprons dollar-for-dollar, the disparity is nowhere near as large as in years past.
Like the Sempron, Celeron models are available with 64-bit support, although again the practicality of running learn more here software on an entry-level processor is questionable.
Once again, it's important to verify the compatibility of your motherboard with the specific Celeron you intend to install, and you may need to upgrade the BIOS to recognize the Celeron.
AVOID NON-D CELERON PROCESSORS Celeron processors without the "D" are based on the Northwood core and have only 128 KB of L2 cache.
These processors have very poor performance, and unfortunately remain available for sale.
The Celeron D models are based on the Prescott-core, and have 256 KB of Types of processor sockets and slots cache.
For more information about Celeron processor models, visit.
A mainstream processor may be a good upgrade choice if you need more performance than a budget processor offers and are willing to pay the additional cost.
However, depending on your motherboard, a mainstream processor may not types of processor sockets and slots an option even if you are willing to pay the extra cost.
Mainstream processors consume considerably more power than most budget processors, often too much to be used on older motherboards.
Also, mainstream processors often use more recent cores, larger L2 caches, and other features that may or may not be compatible with an older motherboard.
An older power supply may not provide enough power for a current mainstream processor, and the new processor may require faster memory than is currently installed.
If you intend to upgrade to a mainstream processor, carefully verify compatibility of the processor, motherboard, power supply, and memory before you buy the processor.
AMD Athlon 64 The AMD Athlon 64 processor, shown in Figure 5-2, is available in Socket 754 and Socket 939 variants.
As its name indicates, the Athlon 64 supports 64-bit software, although only a tiny percentage of Athlon 64 owners run 64-bit software.
Fortunately, the Athlon 64 is equally at home running the 32-bit operating systems and applications software that most of us use.
Like the Sempron, the Athlon 64 has a memory controller built onto the processor die, rather than depending on a memory controller that's part of the chipset.
The upside of this design decision is that Athlon 64 memory performance is excellent.
The downside is that supporting a new type of memory, such as DDR2, requires a processor redesign.
Socket 754 models have a single-channel PC3200 DDR-SDRAM memory controller versus the dual-channel controller in Socket 939 models, so Socket 939 models running at the same clock speed and with https://fablabs.ru/and/18-and-up-casino-az.html same size L2 cache offer somewhat higher performance.
For example, AMD designates a Socket 754 Newcastle-core Athlon 64 with 512 KB of L2 cache running at 2.
NUMBERS LIE The model numbers of Athlon 64 and Sempron processors are scaled differently.
For example, the Socket 754 Sempron 3100+ runs at 1800 MHz and has 256 KB of cache, and the Socket 754 Athlon 64 2800+ runs at the same clock speed and has twice as much cache.
Despite the lower model number, the Athlon 64 2800+ is somewhat faster than the Sempron 3100+.
Although AMD hotly denies it, most industry observers believe that AMD intends Athlon 64 model numbers to be compared with Pentium 4 clock speeds and Sempron model numbers with Celeron clock speeds.
Of course, Intel also designates their recent processors by model number rather than casino du liban beauty and the beast speed, confusing matters even further.
For more information about Athlon 64 processor models, visit.
Intel Pentium 4 The Pentium 4, shown in Figure 5-3, is Intel's flagship processor, and is available in Socket 478 and Socket 775.
Unlike AMD which sometimes uses the same Athlon 64 model number to designate four or more different processors with different clock speeds, L2 cache sizes, and sockets Intel uses a numbering scheme that identifies each model unambiguously.
For example, a Socket 478 Northwood-core Pentium 4 processor operating at a core speed of 2.
Socket 775 Pentium 4 models belong to one of two series.
All 500-series processors use the Prescott-core and have 1 MB of L2 cache.
All 600-series processors use the Prescott 2M core and have 2 MB of L2 types of processor sockets and slots />Intel uses the second number of the model number to indicate relative clock speed.
A "J" following a 500-series model number for example, 560J indicates that the processor supports the XDB feature, but not EM64T 64-bit support.
If a 500-series model number ends in 1 for example, 571 that model supports both the XDB feature and EM64T 64-bit processing.
All 600-series processors support both XDB and EM64T.
For more information about Pentium 4 processor models, visit.
These processors the AMD Athlon 64 FX, the Intel Pentium 4 Extreme Edition, and the Intel Pentium Extreme Edition are targeted at the gaming and enthusiast market, and offer at best marginally faster performance than the fastest mainstream models.
In fact, the performance bump is generally so small that we think anyone who buys one of these processors has more dollars than sense.
If you're considering buying one of these outrageously expensive processors, do yourself a favor.
Either that, or keep the extra money in the bank.
Dual-core processors By early 2005, AMD and Intel had both pushed their processor cores to about the fastest possible speeds, and it had become clear that the only practical way to increase processor performance significantly was to use two processors.
Although it's possible to build systems with two physical processors, doing that introduces many complexities, not least a doubling of the already-high power consumption and heat production.
AMD, later followed by Intel, chose to go dual-core.
Combining two cores in one processor isn't exactly the same thing as doubling the speed of one processor.
For one thing, there is overhead involved in managing the two cores that doesn't exist for a single processor.
Also, in a single-tasking environment, a program thread runs no faster on a dual-core processor than it would on a single-core processor, so doubling the number of cores by no means doubles application performance.
But in a multitasking environment, where many programs and their threads are competing for processor time, the availability of a second processor core means that one thread can run on one core while a second thread runs on the second core.
The upshot is that a dual-core processor typically provides 25% to 75% higher performance than a similar single-core processor if you multitask heavily.
Dual-core performance for a single application is essentially unchanged unless the application is designed to support threading, which many processor-intensive applications are.
For example, a web browser uses threading to keep the user interface responsive even when it's performing a network operation.
Even if you were suites and casino careers only unthreaded applications, though, you'd see some performance benefit from a dual-core processor.
This is true because an operating system, such as Windows XP, that supports dual-core processors automatically allocates different processes to each core.
AMD Athlon 64 X2 The AMD Athlon 64 X2, shown in Figure 5-4, has several things going for it, including high performance, relatively low power requirements and heat production, and compatibility with most existing Socket 939 motherboards.
Fortunately, by late 2005 AMD had begun to ship more reasonably priced dual-core models, although availability is limited.
Intel Pentium D The announcement of AMD's Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processor caught Intel unprepared.
Under the gun, Intel took a cruder approach to making a dual-core processor.
Rather than build an integrated dual-core processor as AMD had with its Athlon 64 X2 processors, Intel essentially slapped two slower Pentium 4 cores on one substrate and called it the Pentium D dual-core processor.
The 800-series 90 nm Smithfield-core Pentium D, shown in Figure 5-5, is a stop-gap kludge for Intel, designed to counter the AMD Athlon 64 X2 until Intel can bring to market its real answer, the dual-core 65 nm Presler-core processor, which is likely to be designated the 900-series Pentium D.
The Presler-based dual-core processors will be fully integrated, compatible with existing dual-core Intel-compatible motherboards, and feature reduced power consumption, lower heat output, twice as much L2 cache, and considerably higher performance.
Reading the foregoing, you might think we had only contempt for the 800-series Pentium D processors.
In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.
They're a kludge, yes, but they're a reasonably cheap, very effective kludge, assuming that you have a motherboard that supports them.
We extensively tested an early sample of the least expensive 800-series Pentium D, the 820.
The 820 runs at 2.
As we added more and more processes, the difference became clear.
Instead of bogging down, as the single-core Prescott would have done, the Pentium D provided snappy response to the foreground process.
For more information about Pentium D processor models, visit.
AMD and Intel processor summaries Table 5-2 lists the important characteristics of current AMD processors, including the special features they support.
Table 5-3 lists the important characteristics of current Intel processors, including the special features they support.
SPECIAL FEATURES Special features are not always implemented across an entire line of https://fablabs.ru/and/65easywin-slotocash.html />For example, we list the Pentium D 8XX-series processors as supporting EM64T, SSE3, EIST, and dual core.
At the time we wrote this, three Pentium D 8XX models were available: the 2.
The 830 and 840 models support all of the special features listed.
The 820 model supports EM64T, SSE3, and dual-core operation, but not EIST.
If a special feature listed as being supported by a particular line of processors is important to you, verify that it is supported in the exact processor model you intend to buy.

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Processor Socket And Slot Types Intel Sockets: LGA 775, LGA 1156, LGA 1366, And LGA 1155 AMD Sockets: AM2/AM2+/AM3/AM3 And F/FM1/FM2 CPU Operating Voltages And Math Coprocessors (Floating-Point.


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types of processor sockets and slots